Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Culminating Project MACIMISE, Guam Group Gathering at Westin Taste

Pictured above (left side of table): Project MACIMISE participants Rosa Salas Palomo, Mary Mafnas, and Matilda Naputi Rivera. Right side: Dr. Donald "Don" Rubinstein, instructor; Bea Camacho, Project MACIMISE participant; and Pat Camacho.


Last night the Guam group involved in Project MACIMISE gathered together at Westin Taste to celebrate in person, instead of the usual online Elluminate sessions. The participants thanked Dr. Don Rubinstein for being an inspirational and culturally-responsive instructor, alongside, Sandy, Don, and Neil who were with us in spirit. The group also congratulated Bea Camacho for being selected for the Project MACIMISE indigenous UH Doctorate Program coordinated by UH and PREL. Congratulations, Bea!

Un Dangkulo Na Si Yu'os Ma'ase', Don, Sandy, Neil, Joe, and fellow Project MACIMISERS, for the wonderful indigenous experience we will always remember. Good luck, and we know that you will do great things for our children! BIBA PROJECT MACIMISE!

Friday, April 30, 2010

A Project MACIMISE Cake JUST FOR YOU!




Dear Fellow MACIMISERS,

WE DID IT! We finished our presentation and submitted our final research paper! It has certainly been a labor of love for me, not only because I did much research involving the mathematics of coconut weaving, but also because I got to learn more about my Chamorro culture and spend more time with my Mom, who is also a coconut-leaf weaver. What was supposed to be only 20 pages ended up being 61 pages long!

In light of our accomplishment, I dedicate this special Project MACIMISE cake (please see image above), JUST FOR YOU -- ALL OF YOU! It has been a wonderful and challenging journey for all of us, and I hope to work closely with you for the years to come, so that we can ultimately make a difference in the mathematics skills of our island's children. KUDOS TO ALL OF YOU!

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

The Countdown Is Here!

5 4 3 2...........................1!

Buenas! Would you believe that the countdown is here already? We have gone through so much and have completed countless of hours and days of research, interviews, exploration of the crafts, etc. The time has come for us to gather all our knowledge on mathematics in an organized and meaningful fashion, so I encourage you to go full force and don't look back, because the countdown will go by so fast! 5, 4, 3, 2......1! Good luck my fellow MACIMISERS!

Presentation completed and good luck on finalizing your research paper!

YOU CAN DO IT!


Hafa Adai! I'm glad that I was able to complete my presentation titled, Using Coconut Weaving in Guam Classrooms to Improve the Mathematics Skills of Local Students. It was also wonderful to view and hear about the different indigenous cultural presentations that were shared tonight! Didn't you just love Rosa's singing of the CHamorita to end our night? I have learned from everyone of you, and I am grateful for the Project MACIMISE experience. Our children will be the ones to benefit from all the hard work we've put into our research.

Now that half of us have completed our presentations, it's now time to finalize our research paper! Remember to meet the deadline by Friday, April 30, 2010 by 5:00 p.m. I am confident that we can all do it! *Here's wishing all of you the BEST!*

Sunday, April 25, 2010

Draft #3 in Progress!

DRAFT #3

Hafa Adai! I have just received my second draft from Don, so the research isn’t over yet! I am now working on draft #3, and I'll be sure to add additional images he requested for each of the weaving crafts I listed in my research paper. The pandanus-leaf mat may be a bit challenging to provide visuals for, but I will certainly do my best, because I'm hitting for the "TARGET" in completing this valuable project. It has been a long journey for me, as I've immersed myself in the project, from interviewing, researching, learning the weaving craft, involving my students in the Chamorro artistry of weaving, completing drafts, and the list goes on. Nevertheless, all the hard work and diligence has enlightened me, as I've been able to connect with and learn more about my Chamorro culture, spend more time with my parents, and in particular, my mother, who is a coconut-leaf weaver and cancer survivor, and so much more! I truly hope to continue the Project MACIMISE journey for all 5 years, so that I can make a difference to ultimately increase the mathematics skills of our island's children. *Here's to the success of Project MACIMISE!*

Snapshot of Presentation - Summary


Summary

Based on the research conducted, the researcher has concluded that coconut-leaf and pandanus-leaf weaving, if used effectively, has the potential to increase the mathematics skills of local students. It involves mathematics skills, such as addition, subtraction, division, patterns, even numbers, and odd numbers.

(Photo)

Figure 14. TINIFOK HAGON NIYOK (Coconut Leaf Weaving) by Antonia Castro

Snapshot of Presentation - Decorative Weaving Crafts


The above image is a screen shot of the Decorative Weaving Crafts I'll be presenting on April 28, 2010. Just in case you're unable to view the image, here's the description on the slide:



-------Decorative Weaving Crafts------


Creating Roses
(Photo)

Figure 33. Creating Roses.

Julia Santos Naputi, coconut-leaf weaver,
holds a rose she weaved.


Creating Grasshoppers
(Photo)

Figure 34. Creating Grasshoppers.
Julia Santos
Naputi, coconut-leaf weaver,
holds a grasshopper she weaved.



Creating Buggy Whips/

Centipedes
(Photo)

Figure 35. Creating Buggy Whips/Centipedes.

Julia Naputi Rivera, granddaughter of

coconut-leaf weaver Julia Santos Naputi,
holds a buggy whip she weaved.




Creating

Fish
(Photo)

Figure 36. Creating Fish.
Julia Santos
Naputi, coconut-leaf
weaver, holds a fish she weaved.


-------Decorative Weaving Crafts------

Saturday, April 24, 2010

Snapshot of Presentation - Utilitarian Weaving Crafts Continued


The above image is a screen shot on the continuation of the Utilitarian Weaving Crafts I'll be presenting on April 28, 2010. Just in case you're unable to view the image, here's the description on the slide:

---------Utilitarian Weaving Crafts Continued---------

Creating Mats
(Photo)

Figure 18. Creating Mats.

Lois Taitano Gumataotao is pictured with
a pandanus-leaf mat she has used over
the years for resting, picnicking, and placing
items on.


Creating Bracelets
(Photo)

Figure 19. Creating Bracelets.

Julia Santos Naputi, coconut-leaf weaver, is
shown wearing the bracelet she weaved. The
bracelet is on her left wrist.


Creating Baskets
(Photo)

Figure 20. Fruit Basket weaved by Robert
Morrison.
Source: Morrison & Healani (2000)



---------Utilitarian Weaving Crafts Continued---------

Snapshot of Presentation - Utilitarian Weaving Crafts


The above image is a screen shot of the Utilitarian Weaving Crafts I'll be presenting on April 28, 2010. Just in case you're unable to view the image, here's the description on the slide:


-------------Utilitarian Weaving Crafts-------------

Creating Hats
(Photo)

Figure 15. Creating Hats.
Coconut-leaf weaver Julia Santos Naputi
wears a coconut hat she weaved and
displays the other articles she weaved,
including fans of different sizes and a rose.


Creating Headbands
(Photo)

Figure 16. Creating Heabands.

Julia Santos Naputi, coconut-leaf weaver
teaches Matilda Naputi Rivera (center)
how to weave a headband, while Rivera’s
son, Joaquin Naputi Abraham Rivera
observes the weaving process.


Creating Fans
(Photo)

Figure 17: Creating Fans.

Julia Santos Naputi, coconut-leaf weaver,
is in the process of completing her fan.

-------------Utilitarian Weaving Crafts-------------

Snapshot of Presentation - Interview Responses


The above image is a screen shot of the Interview Responses I'll be presenting on April 28, 2010. Just in case you're unable to view the image, here's the description on the slide:

-----------------------Interview Responses-----------------------

According to Cruz (2010), “coconut weaving involves addition, subtraction, and division.” He said that when you make a certain basket, in order to close the bottom you would have to divide the coconut leaves. He further said that pandanus baskets always need to have an even number of leaves to split and that odd numbers would not allow you to complete your ideal basket. He said that there is a pattern that must be followed in weaving. For example, for certain types of coconut baskets, 12, 16, 20 leaves are needed, but they will all be different sizes. This is also the same case for fans, which follow an “over and under” pattern throughout the course of creating the art piece (Naputi, 2010).

Cunningham (2010) further emphasized the importance of coconut weaving. "Coconut weaving is effective in teaching mathematics, because it addresses the number one problem with mathematics instruction. Mathematics should be taught with practical applications, then students understand why they need to learn mathematics. The students can see practical necessity for mathematics."

---------------------------Interview Responses------------------------

Snapshot of Presentation - Chamorro Artistry of Weaving


The above image is a screen shot of the Chamorro Artistry of Weaving slide I'll be presenting on April 28, 2010. Just in case you're unable to view the image, here's the description on the slide:



------------------Chamorro Artistry of Weaving-------------------

Guam has a rich heritage and tradition in folk arts, such as the art of coconut-leaf and pandanus-leaf weaving. For thousands of years Chamorros have used Guam’s abundant foliage to produce useful and unique items (Anderson, 2010). Although the Chamorro artistry of weaving is not used as much anymore, attempts to revive the art is currently being done by the Gef Pago Cultural Center in Inarajan, Guam and other local artists.

------------------Chamorro Artistry of Weaving-------------------

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Snapshot of Presentation - Research Questions


The above image is a screen shot of the research questions I'll be presenting on April 28, 2010. Just in case you're unable to view the image, here's the description on the slide:

------------------Research Questions------------------

Research Questions

The researcher asked the following questions in her interviews:
1. Are you a weaver? If not, skip to question 4.
2. How long have you been weaving?
3. What crafts do you weave?
4. How long does it take to weave certain crafts?
5. Is there a pattern that must be followed in weaving? (eg. Counting by 3’s, 5’s, 8’s)
6. What math activities would you recommend for grades 1, 4, and 7?
7. Why is coconut weaving an effective activity for teaching math?
8. Why is coconut weaving important to our Chamorro culture?
9. What special message would you like to pass on to our people regarding the importance of coconut weaving?

----------------Research Questions------------------

Saturday, April 17, 2010

Snapshot of Presentation - Methodology



The above image is a sreen shot of the Methodology I'll be presenting on April 28, 2010. Just in case you're unable to view the image, here's the description on the slide:


-------------Methodology Slide------------

The research was conducted by interviewing indigenous coconut-leaf and pandanus-leaf weavers, as well as laborious reviews of offline and online published books and articles on the Chamorro culture. The researcher consulted with Chamorro teachers knowledgeable about weaving, a recognized Master Weaver, a researcher who has done extensive research in Chamorro history and has published several books on the Chamorro culture, and her mother who is a coconut-leaf weaver.

-------------Methodology Slide------------


Once again, good luck to all of you as you finalize your research paper!

All the best,
Matilda

Friday, April 16, 2010

Snapshot of Presentation - Introduction


The above image is a sreen shot of the introduction I'll be presenting on April 28, 2010. Just in case you're unable to view the image, here's the description on the slide:

---------------Introduction Slide--------------

My research paper describes selected examples of contemporary coconut-leaf and pandanus-leaf weaving in Guam. It will explore utilitarian items, such as hats, headbands, fans, mats, bracelets, and baskets, as well as decorative items, such as roses, grasshoppers, whips, and fish.

---------------Introduction Slide--------------


Once again, good luck to all of you as you finalize your research paper!

Thursday, April 15, 2010

Project MACIMISE Featured in the Spring 2010 Pacific Educator

Dear Fellow MACIMISERS,

Congratulations! Project MACIMISE was featured in the Spring 2010 Pacific Educator! Sandy's article was well written, as he described details of the project and its importance pertaining to mathematics, and more! View the article below or visit the following URL http://www.prel.org/products/paced/spring10/14_MACIMISE.pdf to view the article. BIBA PROJECT MACIMISE!


Snapshot of My Coconut Weaving Presentation

The above image is a snapshot of the first slide of my coconut weaving presentation schedued for April 28, 2010. You'll notice different pictures of my first grade ESL groups that I service, along with a picture of my Mom teaching me how to weave with coconut leaves, as my youngest son observes the process. My students are pictured with the coconut-weaved items I personally created, with the exception of the hats, which were weaved by my Mom. They were happy to wear and show off the weaved items, especially since it was Chamorro Month! Biba Chamorro!

Sunday, April 11, 2010

My Personal Interviews



It has been a long, yet rewarding Project MACIMISE journey for all of us. In particular, we are all currently finishing up the details of our research paper. In light of this, I'd like to share with you the names of those I've interviewed, and of which are located below. Good luck in completing your paper!


PERSONS INTERVIEWED

Arceo, A. Personal INTERVIEW. 20 March 2010.
Female, age 42, Agat. Founder of HurĂ¥o Academy with 20 years of teaching Chamorro and expertise in Chamorro language and culture.

Bamba, J. Personal INTERVIEW. 14 March 2010.
Male, age 29, Agana Heights. Coconut-leaf and pandanus-leaf weaver of 15 years and translator for the U.S. Air Force and foreign language instructor for junior translators.

Cruz, J.A. Personal INTERVIEW. 12 March 2010.
Male, age 33, Mangilao. Coconut-leaf and pandanus-leaf weaver of 15 years and English instructor for the University of Guam’s TRIO Programs, Student Support Services.

Cruz, J.Q. Personal INTERVIEW. 12 March 2010.
Male, age 64, Barrigada Heights. Guam Education Policy Board member, former University of Guam President, retired UOG Administration and Supervision Program Advisor/Associate Professor.

Cunningham, L. Personal INTERVIEW. 22 March 2010.
Male, age 67, Agat. Researcher, educator, and author of ancient Chamorros and traditional navigation and seafaring.

Guerrero, A. Personal INTERVIEW. 20 March 2010.
Male, age 62, Chalan Pago. Chamorro teacher of 25 years with specialization in Chamorro culture and language.

Gumataotao, A. Personal INTERVIEW. 17 March 2010.
Female, age 43, Toto. Teacher assistant with specialization in cooking Chamorro food.

Gumataotao, L. Personal INTERVIEW. 15 March 2010.
Female, age 59, Agana Heights. Former administrator and ESL teacher in the Guam Department of Education.

Lastimoza, R. Personal INTERVIEW. 16 March 2010.
Female, age 46, Tamuning. First grade teacher in the Guam Department of Education.

Laguana, R. Personal INTERVIEW. 15 March 2010.
Male, age 50, Mangilao. Adminstrator for the Guam Department of Education Chamoru Studies Division with specialization in the following: Chamorro language, culture, history, translating, editing, transcribing, interpreting, and tour guiding.

Naputi, J. N. Personal INTERVIEW. 23 February 2010.
Male, age 59, Tamuning. Farmer, writer, and agriculturalist for over 50 years.

Naputi, J.S. Personal INTERVIEW. 6 February 2010.
Female, age 56, Tamuning, Coconut-leaf weaver with specialization in arts and crafts.

Rojas, D. Personal INTERVIEW. 17 March 2010.
Female, age 61, MongMong, Chamorro teacher in the Guam Department of Education.

Sablan, P. Personal INTERVIEW. 25 March 2010.
Male, age 46, Santa Rita. Coconut-leaf weaver, cultural tattoo artist, stone sculpture and body ornamentation (shell) specialist.

Salas, A. Personal INTERVIEW. 26 March 2010.
Female, age 52, Piti. Chamorro teacher with specialization in the Chamorro language and culture.

A Teacher's Math Prayer

The mathematics research is ongoing for me, but I also think that it's important for us to pray every now and then to give us the strength and move forward to complete our goal of completing our research paper and ultimately impacting our students' mathematics skills. Please see the brief prayer below.

A Teacher's Math Prayer

Dear God,
Today's a busy day.
Please hear my Math wish.
In Math, I want to teach students
That bad deeds are reduced to their lowest terms
When good deeds are multiplied.
Give them the skills that will increase their knowledge
To understand that good things will come
If we add good routines and subtract the bad ones.
Help them to know that
For every action
There is an equal and opposite reaction.
That the grade they receive
Is dependent on their good deeds.
AMEN.

Source: Anonymous

Additional Guam historical pictures of thatched homes created with coconut leaves

As you know, I'm actively involved in my research of coconut weaving. I'm still working on my research draft, but I wanted to share with you the additional information I discovered, which is the Guam historical pictures of thatched homes created with coconut leaves. It should be noted that the source of the historical pictures titled, "Hale'-ta, I Ma Gobetna-na Guam, Governing Guam: Before and After the Wars" was commisioned by the Political Status Education Coordinating Commission. This Commission was established by Public Law 20-99 and mandated to develop a curriculum of political status studies for Guam schools. The Commission is composed of seven members, including three representatives from the Guam Department of Education, a representative each from the University of Guam, Guam Community College, and Commission on Self-Determination, and a representative of the Community At Large.

Enjoy the following historical pictures I discovered as part of my research on coconut weaving.

NOTE: Click on the images below to get a better view of the respective pictures.











Reference:

Political Status Education Coordinating Commission (1994). Hale'ta, I Ma Gobetna-na Guam, Governing Guam: Before and After the Wars. Agana, GU.

Sunday, April 4, 2010

Coconut Weaving is in the Air

The active engagement I put into my coconut weaving research has come at an opportune time, as the Guam Department of Education has just completed its Chamorro Month - March! As such, my English Language Learners in kindergarten and first grade were happy to celebrate with me in a coconut-weaving photo moment! Pictured below are my groups that I service at different times throughout the day. You'll notice that each group has a food name, and this category was purposely selected to motivate them, especially at a time when the BMI policy prevents our teachers from giving out any food treats at anytime, even during birthdays, special occasions, etc. for health reasons. Times have changed, so we must move forward and make the most of our situation. Nevertheless, enjoy the pictures of my ELLs using the coconut-weaved crafts that I personally created, with the exception of the hats, which I'm still trying to learn to weave. Please note that my ESL parents have signed media waivers for their children. It is important that such agreements are signed before any publication is made.


Introducing my Banana Puddings...




Introducing my Blueberry Muffins...




Introducing my Mango Smoothies...

Saturday, April 3, 2010

Roof Thatching Pictures and Song

Ever since I narrowed my indigenous topic to coconut weaving, it seems like my world has revolved around any information pertaining to it, especially with information regarding mathematics terms. For example, during a proclamation signing for the Guam Child Care and Development Association's (GCCDA) Child Care Givers Appreciation Week and 2010 Professional Leadership Conference, I saw a miniature version of an Ancient Chamorro Village containing replicas of coconut leaf thatched roof homes, and I automatically started taking pictures. Below are the pictures that I took while we were waiting for the Lt. Governor Mike Cruz to enter the conference room.





Pictured above: Coconut leaf thatched roof home replicas depicting the ancient Chamoru homes. The artifacts were created by Mr. and Mrs. Juan Babauta Chaco & Family.



In addition, Dr. Larry Cunningham has shared with me photos of his Canoe House, along with a special coconut weaving roof thatching song, which I've included below.

Balanggai - Roof Thatching Party
Gupot Atof - A Roofing Party

Thatching Song: Chamorita Higai
(Santos, 1989, p. 92; Reprinted courtesy of the Richard Flores Taitano Micronesian Area Research Center; Collected by Carmen Garrido Iglesias AKA Carmen I. Santos)



Below are the before and after pictures of the paseo canoe house provided by Dr. Cunningham.

Pictured above: Paseo Canoe House (SAHYAN TASI FACHEMWAN) before the weaving/thatching of the roof took place.


Pictured above: The Paseo Canoe House (SAHYAN TASI FACHEMWAN) after the roof has been thatched with coconut leaves.

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Happy Easter Fellow MACIMISERS!


Dear Fellow MACIMISERS,

I would like to wish all of you a Happy Easter! Cherish the special time you have with your family and friends, while trying to balance your Project MACIMISE research paper in between, along with your other duties. It is challenging, but with much perseverance, we can do it! Remember that our ultimate goal is to impact our students' mathematics skills. Good luck!

All the best,
Si Matilda

Image source: www.slowtrav.com

Today's Session: Additional Time for Research Paper


Today's session was set aside to allow us to further work on our research paper, and I am grateful for the opportunity that was afforded. After having done much research and interviews on coconut weaving, I now must remain focused on my topic, Using Coconut Weaving in Guam Classrooms to Improve the Mathematics Skills of Local Students. There is so much information, but ensuring that the mathematics focus is truly maintained is critical. I have edited my paper, but I am not comfortable yet in resubmitting it for review. When I feel that it is worthy, then I will submit it to Don. I wish all of my fellow MACIMISERS the very best in finalizing their research paper!

All the best,
Si Matilda

Resource Lent by Chamorro Teacher Sinora Antonia Salas


As part of my interview process, I was fortunate enough to interview Sinora Antonia Salas, Chamorro teacher, who shared with me a wonderful coconut leaf weaving resource titled, "The Guide to Basket Weaving, Creative Weaving with Coconut Palms" written by Robert Morrison and Auntie Healani.


The following are snapshots taken from the resource detailing steps for weaving a fruit basket, which requires various mathematics steps that must be followed in detail. You'll notice various mathematical wording in each of the steps, including the following: one side, 16 leaves, same width, 40 inches long, each end, midrib thin enough, even circle, one hand, first leaf, spaced evenly, circle is tied, making a circle, two notches, let the circle go, cut two more notches, on the opposite side, with the first cut, repeat cuts on the other end, bend the frond into a circle, lining up the notches, tie the circle, at each end, one end of the string, one direction, wrap the other end, other notches, in the opposite direction, tie three knots, hold the circle, leaflets facing down, direction the leaves are pointing, under the first leaf, over and under the next six leaves, in the direction the leaves are pointing, around the circle, turn the bowl upside down, tighten and even the basket, pull each leaf down, turn the bowl right side up, through the center, turning the bowl upside down, holding all the leaves upward, take out one leaf in front, count seven leaves, bring it across the leaves on the opposite side of the circle, inserting it under the seventh leaf, first leaf behind the leaf, bring it across the circle through the sixth leaf, finish the bottom circle, grasp one leaf, working in the direction that the leaves overlap at the center of the bowl, adjusts the star pattern at the bottom, star leaves tend to bend in the opposite direction, turn the bowl upright, working from the inside and outside, hold a finger at the intersection of leaves and push upward on the star leaf from the bottom, pull on the opposite leaves, a little at a time, bottom is flat with the circle, and weave the ends of the leaves & plait them outside the bowl.


FRUIT BASKET STEPS:


Step 1: Select a section on the one side of the frond with 16 leaves that are the same width and at least 40 inches long. Take a leaf off each end, and shave the midrib thin enough to make an even circle when it's bent.

Step 2: Hold the leaves in one hand, with the midrib facing down.


Step 3: Cut where the first leaf was pulled off, so that leaves will be spaced evenly when a circle is tied.




Step 4: Making a circle, cut two notches on the midrib, and let the circle go. Hold the leaf with the midrib facing you, and cut two more notches on the opposite side, even with the first cut. Repeat the same cuts on the other end.


Step 5: Bend the frond into a circle, lining up the notches. Tie the circle with strong, leaving plenty of string at each end. Wrap one end of the string around the midrib and notches, going in one direction. Then wrap the other end of the string around the midrib and the other notches, in the opposite direction. Tie three knots and cut off the excess string.


Step 6: Hold the circle with the leaflets rib facing down. You will be working in the direction the leaves are pointing. Starting with any leaf, weave under the first leaf, then over and under the next six leaves. Continue working in the direction the leaves are pointing, finishing the rest of the leaves around the circle.



Step 7: Turn the bowl upside down, with the leaves going down. To tighten and even the basket, start with any leaf and pull it tightly at the midrib. Continue to pull each leaf down snug. This process should be repeated until the weaving is evenly tightened.


Step 8: Turn the bowl right side up. Looking through the center of the bowl, push all the leaves through the bottom.



Step 9: Start by turning the bowl upside down and holding all leaves upward. Take out one leaf, starting with the leaf in front, and count seven leaves in the direction they are leaning. Start with the leaf hanging out and bring it across the leaves on the opposite side of the circle, inserting it under the seventh leaf.



Step 10: Start with the first leaf behind the leaf you just inserted, and bring it across the cirlce through the sixth leaf.



Step 11: In that fashion, finish the bottom circle. Grasp one leaf and the opposite side leaf, then pull away from the bowl. Keep going with the same process, working in the direction that the leaves overlap at the center of the bowl.



Step 12: This step adjusts the star pattern at the bottom of the bowl. Star leaves tend to bend in the opposite direction than they should be going. Turn the bowl upright. Working from the inside and outside, hold a finger at the intersection of leaves and push upward on the star leaf from the bottom. Turn the bowl over. Working as before, pull on the opposite leaves to tighten a little at a time. Finish tightening until the bottom is flat with the circle.



Final step: Optional: Cut the tips of the leaves. To finish the bowl, weave the ends of the leaves and plait them outside the bowl. Cut off excess leaf ends.


Completed fruit basket!


Reference:

Morrison, R. & Healani, A. (2000). The Guide to Basket Weaving, Creative Weaving with Coconut Palms. 'Aiea, HI: Island Heritage Publishing.

Salas, A. Personal INTERVIEW. 26 March 2010.

Sunday, March 28, 2010

Snapshots from my research

As part of my research, I've included snapshots on the indigenous use of coconut weaving, which requires much mathematical skills, and of which was used daily in Guam's past and is used only by a few Chamorros today. Enjoy the following images:


Pictured above: Chamorros showcase their coconut leaf baskets.
Source: Palms Press (1988)


Pictured above: Dignitaries are wearing coconut leaf hats.
Source: Palms Press (1988)



Pictured above: Temporary housing - Following liberation, the Military Government built temporary homes in Talofofo, Yona, Sinajana, Barrigada, Dededo, Toto, Agat, and Santa Rita. Top two photos are of the wood and thatched-roof homes built away from the refugee camps. Below the two photos: The temporary village of Agat.
Source: Sanchez (1988)



Pictured above: Late 1944: Homes had thatched roofs and wooden sidings. Late 1946: By 1946, tarpaulin had replaced thatched roofs. Late 1950: By 1950 corrugated tins had taken the place of thatched roofs and tarpaulin as Guamanians improved their homes.
Source: Sanchez (1988)


Pictured above: The construction of most houses was inexpensive, cool and easily replaceable after a typhoon.
Source: Farrell (1981)



Pictured above: Houses built from bamboo and coconut leaf were erected on stilts for ventilation.
Source: Farrell (1981)



Pictured above: Thatched roof houses with open bamboo walls housed large Guamanian families. Cooking was done outside, under a thatched canopy attached to the house.
Source: Farrell (1981)



Pictured above: A typical Guamanian village of the early 1900s showing the supporting pedestal and the thatched roof.
c)



Pictured above: A roof raising was a village affair. The women would weave the leaves and prepare the fiesta food for the men to eat after they finished lashing the woven coconut leaves onto the woven frame.
Source: Farrell (1981)



References:

Farrell, D. (1981). The Pictorial History of Guam, Guam: 1898-1918. Tamuning, GU: Micronesian Productions.

Sanchez, P. (1988). Guahan GUAM: The History of Our Island. Agana, GU: Sanchez Publishing House.

The Palms Press. Hafa Adai Guam, 1988-1989, A VISIT TO THE VILLAGES